Martha's Gardens is proud to

announce that we have achieved  

Organic Certification! 
 

What does "Organic" actually  mean?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



The USDA National Organic Program (NOP) defines organic as follows:

 

Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations.  Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled "Organic," a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified, too.

 

Our farming practices are free of potentially harmful chemicals contained in the chemicals found in common pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides.  Farming organically helps to protect the health of the soil. Healthy soils are the basis for healthy food production.  Soils maintain a diverse community of organisms that chemicals in pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides can destroy.  Soil health & its fertility have a direct influence on the nutrient content of food crops.  When nutrient content of food is higher, taste is usually better.

 

There is mounting evidence that organically grown foods generate more phytonutrients,  Phytonutrients, such as polyphenols and antioxidants, protect both plants and the people who eat these plants.  Pesticides - insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides - actually block a plant's ability to manufacture these important plant compounds. Without them, plants are handicapped and too weak to fight off pests. The organic farmer, on the other hand, builds up these important nutrients by feeding the soil, emboldening the plants to naturally defend themselves against pests and disease.  

 

   So, to summarize:

Healthier Soil = Healthier Palms = Healthier Dates = Better Tasting Dates = Happier Customers